Ready to Learn

Mobile Technologies and Learning

Learn more about the role mobile technologies can play in children’s education in “Pockets of Potential: Using Mobile Technologies to Promote Children’s Learning,” (PDF) published by the Joan Ganz Cooney Center.

iPod Study: Learning Vocabulary with the Martha Speaks app

A PBS KIDS Study finds that mobile apps are a new source of learning. The study found that vocabulary improved as much as 31 percent in children ages three to seven who played with the popular MARTHA SPEAKS app, which was created by series producer WGBH. Read a press release about this study (PDF) conducted by Rockman et al.

Also available, an executive summary of this study (PDF).


Cell Phone Study: Learning Letters with Elmo

In a spring/summer 2006 evaluation of the educational effectiveness of cell phone video streaming technology, parents reported an increase in their children's knowledge of the alphabet, and in their own initiation of literacy-related activities with their children, suggesting a promising new tool to increase early literacy skills. The evaluation was designed to assess the level of acceptance of cell phones as a medium for delivering educational content to parents of preschool children and to assess any effects and differences between participants living in households at or below the poverty line and those living above the poverty line. The PBS KIDS Ready To Learn Cell Phone Study: Learning Letters with Elmo found the video content and delivery pairing made the most impact among those participating households at or below the poverty level, compared with those living above the poverty line.

The PBS KIDS Ready To Learn Cell Phone Study: Learning Letters with Elmo was developed in partnership with Sesame Workshop, Sprint, WestEd and GoTV Networks. The study was part of the U.S. Department of Education's Ready To Learn-funded literacy initiative, in partnership with PBS and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB).

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