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Ask the Expert #4
Posted June 12, 2000
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Question:

I'm eight (almost nine), I've climbed in Idaho, California, Nevada, Washington, Colorado and Canada. My dad is a professional rock climber, but he's also a minister. I want to be a climber, archaeologist or an astronomer, maybe a fighter pilot (my dad was on a aircraft carrier). I wish you luck on Denali. Please write me back and tell me what the best part of the route was.

Sincerely,

Michael
Kansas



Response from Caitlin Palmer:

So far, the best part of the route is from Windy Corner at 13,200 feet to 14,200 feet. Here, we can see the upper parts of the mountain and beautiful vistas along the way. Crevasses at Windy Corner are spectacular because the glacier drops 4,000 feet creating such a steep drop with many large cracks.



Question:

I am looking at the mountain climbers with interest. I used to live by the mountains, and my dad taught people how to climb. As far as I know I still hold the record as the youngest person to climb the longest rock climb in Idaho. We've climbed in Yosemite, California and in Canada, also in Washington and Colorado. I'm looking forward to moving back to the mountains soon. I wish success to the climbers on Denali; I've never been to Alaska but my dad has climbed there. If you have any advice for me, I want to be a climber like my dad, but I also want to be a paleoarchaeologist or an astronomer. My dad is going to be a doctor, but the kind of doctor that ministers become—lots of reading and writing, not a physician. I'm 9 years old now and will be a scientist kind of doctor.

Michael
Kansas



Response from John Grunsfeld:

Be sure to study lots of math and science and spend time exploring both in school and in the outdoors.



Comment:

Hey you are doing a great job, keep it up, don't lose hope no matter how bleak the chances of succeeding are. No matter how many people die, keep going. good luck.

Have a grand day,

Jacob
Oregon



Comment:

Hello. Hope you guys are staying safe. Good luck on your climb. We wish that we could experience seeing the sights that you will see first hand. Your Website is really cool and informative. Your web site is really inspiring. Again, good luck.

Sandy and Jolie
Oregon



Comment:

Good luck on your climb. We hope that everyone has tons of fun and stays safe. hope to hear from you all soon and again good luck.

Matt and Griffin
Oregon



Comment:

Keep it up, y'all. Take care up there, and have a great time. Am anxious to hear about it in future updates to the site.

Good luck! Sarah Oregon

Sarah
Oregon



Comment:

Keep up the good work. This web site is amazing!! We are so impressed. Our prayers are with you!

Suzie and Melissa
Oregon



Question:

We are a group of summer school students in school for the month of June. There are eight of us plus one teacher. We are going to be following you on your journey.

We have flown the route up the mountain, and we are interested to find out how hot John is. We also look forward to your daily dispatches to find out how your team is doing. We hope you have a successful expedition.

Happy hiking,





Response from Liesl Clark:

Thanks for following us. As we type this John's core body temperature is 99.5°F.



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