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PBS Kids Videotapes
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Click, Clack, Moo icon


Joseph Had a Little Overcoat icon

Record Off Air
If you are a K-12 teacher or school librarian, you may record the programs off air and use them for up to one year for educational, non-commercial use. Check your local Between the Lions TV schedule to find current shows.

Dual-captioned Between The Lions Videotapes
You can order videotapes of the half-hour Between The Lions television program that contain the original versions of the stories used in Cornerstones. These tapes are the same episodes that appear on PBS and they do not include the signed stories created for Cornerstones. The signed Cornerstones videos are only available on the Web. However, all of these Between The Lions tapes do have two levels of captions — a stream of edited captions in addition to the standard verbatim captions.

Videotapes
Educators can order Between the Lions videotapes from:

WGBH Boston Video
PO Box 2284
South Burlington, VT 04507-2284  
Phone: 1-800-949-8670

Volume discounts are available.

The Fox and the Crow  videotape: item #WG35103
Clickety-clack, Clickety-clack!  videotape: item #WG1276
Joseph Had a Little Overcoat  videotape: item #WG3039

About edited captions
Standard captions usually appear on CC1. To see the edited captions, select CC2 in the caption menu, generally available via the VCR's remote control.

Unlike print on the page, captions appear and disappear at a predetermined rate. Standard captions display at the rate of speech and are generally verbatim; virtually all the words and sounds appear as text. This can sometimes be too fast for non-fluent readers, or for fluent readers who want more time to look at the video.

The goal of edited captions is to reduce the viewer's frustration. Edited captions make it more likely that viewers will enjoy and benefit from the program. Edited captions display at one or two words per second, with up to half the words cut to make this possible. At the same time, some difficult vocabulary and figurative language is replaced with text that viewers are likely to recognize more quickly.

Here is an example from Between the Lions.

Original captions:
"No, we do not! We never eat patrons of any kind. We are library lions."
(Fifteen words)

Edited captions:
"We do not eat our library friends."
(Seven words, with "friends" replacing "patrons")

If you would like to see edited captions on other programs, check out Arthur, the popular PBS Kids show. To learn more about edited captions on Arthur, visit The Caption Center.


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