Noticias del Laboratorio

  • Blog: Bridging the Achievement Gap with Educational Media

    April 13, 2012

    By Rob Lippincott, Senior Vice President of Education, PBS
    Debra Sanchez, Senior Vice President, Education and Children's Content, CPB
    Cross-posted at the Huffington Post 

    For years, early educators have debated whether there is a place for media in learning environments for young children. The National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) and the Fred Rogers Center recently completed the adoption and release of a joint position statement on technology and interactive media as early childhood educational tools, offering guidelines for the appropriate use of technology and media to support learning for young children. This new statement confirms what the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) and PBS have been contending for years: educational media can be integrated into early learning environments in a way that is both appropriate and beneficial.

    With so many new technologies available to today's kids, the position statement offers key guidelines on how we can leverage these new innovations to help kids learn -- which we believe can have real impact in closing the achievement gap. This could not come at a more critical time, as two-thirds of America's children are not reading at grade level by the end of 3rd grade, and more than 60 percent of all fourth graders are not proficient in math. These statistics foreshadow the more than 1 million kids who drop out of high school every year, severely limiting their options and costing our nation more than $100 billion in lost wages, taxes and human potential.

    As NAEYC and the Fred Rogers Center move forward, the good news is that they do not have to go it alone. CPB and PBS continue to be committed to using the power of media to help accelerate early learning, especially for kids from low-income families. Through a forward-looking grant from the U.S. Department of Education called Ready To Learn, CPB and PBS have several projects underway aimed at creating and researching educationally sound and developmentally-appropriate media, and empowering educators, caregivers and parents to be well-informed media mediators for their students and children.

    We've already seen amazing results in our work in using multimedia content to support early learning. Third-party research has demonstrated that integrating PBS KIDS content in preschool settings can help kids build key skills for success in school. For example, a recent study found that kids who participated in a PBS KIDS curriculum outscored their peers in the control group on all five tested measures of early literacy.

    And as access to new technologies continues to rise, our mission is to build on this success, and to continue to find the learning potential on every new platform. CPB and PBS are working with top kids' media producers, technology experts, educators and researchers to produce suites of content across platforms -- with online games, mobile apps and interactive whiteboard games -- to help children build early math and literacy skills. And we're testing this approach to learn more about how interactive media in early education can help bridge the achievement gap.

    Yet as the NAEYC position statement also points out, it is going to take more than developing content for kids to effectively use media in early learning settings; we also need to provide resources for teachers, caregivers and parents to support that learning. All of America's parents and educators must be equipped with equitable access to technology and interactive media experiences -- and the knowledge of how to effectively use them -- to better prepare our children for success in school and life.

    This is a challenging assignment that requires all of us who work in this space to turn our attention to capacity-building in the field. This effort should include high-quality teacher professional development, family training, and a push for a national policy movement to equip America's Title I elementary schools and early childcare centers with cutting-edge digital technology tools, so that our children, both in school and out-of-school settings, are not left behind. That's why we're partnering with Boston University to pilot and test teaching modules to help preschool teachers successfully integrate media into their classrooms to enhance students' learning. We are also working with the Chicago Public Schools' Virtual PreK and K programs to develop resources to bridge learning at home and in school.

    Since its inception more than 40 years ago, public media has worked with visionaries like Fred Rogers to use the power of television to help kids learn. Over the last 20 years, public media has demonstrated that same potential with award-winning digital content online, on mobile, and beyond. We've seen through research that educational programming across platforms can have real impact in narrowing the achievement gap.

    As we continue to look forward and innovate in the children's media space, we believe that NAEYC and Fred Rogers Center have produced a core policy statement that is relevant to the entire field of early childhood education in the 21st century, and will help guide the effective use of technology and media to improve academic outcomes. Let's embrace technology for our youngest citizens in a way that will help them learn and grow, using this new statement as a guide as we craft strategies and tools to help narrow the achievement gap and better prepare all of our children for success.

  • Blog: Taking the Transmedia Journey

    April 13, 2012

    Blog: Taking the Transmedia Journey Within the Public Media Environment

    By Rob Lippincott, Senior Vice President of Education, PBS
    Cross-posted at GetIdeas.org 

    Since its inception more than 40 years ago, public media has worked with visionaries like Jim Henson, Joan Ganz Cooney, and Fred Rogers to use the power of television to help America’s children learn, especially children living in poverty. Over the last 20 years, we have demonstrated that if you apply the same principles to the design and production of content online, on mobile, at home, and in the classroom, you can use these technologies to engage and accelerate learning.

    We are constantly examining how new technologies effect children, exploring new ways to leverage PBS KIDS characters as educational magnets, and how to co-opt and deploy new approaches to learning like transmedia within new technologies for anywhere, anytime learning in underserved communities.

    The recent success of PBS KIDS’ cross-platform content in advancing children’s literacy learning has led us to discover, for example, that kids who interact with our math content across multiple platforms will learn more than those who just interact with our math content on one platform. Through a forward-looking grant from the U.S. Department of Education called Ready To Learn (RTL), the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) and PBS are pioneering and testing this transmedia approach to learning. We are working with top producers of every kind of kids media along with technology experts, educators, and researchers to produce transmedia suites – collections of video clips, online games, mobile apps, and interactive whiteboard games that feature the same characters and all tie to the same curriculum framework – to help build early math skills of children ages 2-8, particularly from low-income communities. Public television stations and their partners are delivering this content on-air, on-line, and on-the ground to children throughout the nation.

    Public media’s transmedia approach to learning looks at different inputs for kids. For example, usability testing has revealed that tablets and other touchscreen devices are more intuitive and appealing to young children than a clunky keyboard and mouse. In addition, we’re experimenting with game mechanics that use a computer’s microphone and webcam, and require children to clap or make gestures – to jump or use their hands to make moves in a game. We’re also conducting experiments with augmented reality, immersive world environments, and 3D-rendered collaborative play. It’s critical that we understand how these technologies work, and we are partnering with a tremendous set of technologists and producers like Professor Blair MacIntyre from Georgia Tech and Bill Shribman from WGBH in Boston to unleash the learning potential of each platform. At the same time, we know that a three year old needs a very different match of technology than a five year old, so everything we do is driven by age-appropriate skill and curriculum frameworks. We are working with child development experts to ensure that we pair the right technologies with the right skill sets for the right age groups, and we’ve developed a best practices guide to help PBS KIDS producers make the right matches when designing their transmedia content.

    Empowering the adults in children’s lives to be knowledgeable transmedia mediators is the goal behind our Ready To Learn-funded partnerships with the Boston University School of Education (BU-SED), with Chicago Public Schools Virtual Pre-K and K (VPK) program, and with the Campaign for Grade Level Reading (CGLR). BU-SED is piloting and testing teaching modules to help preschool teachers successfully integrate media into their classrooms to enhance students’ learning, and VPK is creating resources to bridge learning at home and in school. CGLR is partnering with us to create a free bilingual mobile app for Android and IOS platforms that will be launching later this year. The mobile app will be designed to equip parents of children ages 0 to 5 with insights on the stages of their children’s growth and will feature a variety of ways to foster literacy and math development through intergenerational on-screen activities (for parents of children ages 2-4) and off-screen activities (for parents of children ages 0-2).

    Assessing the impact of our transmedia content is key, and renowned third-party researchers including WestEd, EDC, and SRI International are conducting the formative and summative evaluations to test the efficacy of our approach in both formal and informal settings. In addition, public media is working with UCLA CRESST to prototype a progress tracking system that will feature a COPPA-compliant identify system, sophisticated data analysis tools, and reporting applications that equip parents and educators with the means to measure children’s progress across multiple platforms, in real time.

    Our transmedia approach to learning requires all of us who work in this space to turn our attention to capacity-building in the field, including high-quality teacher professional development, family training, and a push for a national policy movement to equip America’s Title I elementary schools and early childcare centers in underserved communities with cutting-edge digital technology tools, so that our children, both in school and in out-of-school settings, are not left behind.